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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 09:42 AM

Time for photos. I'm going to limit it to 5 per post since I started this once and then accidently hit a link about half way through in my browser window and it deleted it all...

I started by getting everything out and looking it all over. Desk was cleaned up and ready to get started.



Bag 1; I'd love to tell you that everything you need to complete the Bag 1steps are in it, but they aren't. A lot of steps require you to go into Bag B, which had all the bumbers and supporting hardware. I ended up putting the contents of that bag on a table behind me so I could quickly grab what I needed from it.



Assembly begins with the upper front bulkhead. One thing that bothered me was the fact that the kit comes with plastic spacers to adjust roll height, etc. The manual calls for two of those washers here, but the setup I decided to go with only called for one. I've also got some aluminum spacers coming to replace the plastic ones; the plastics will compress if you tighten them too much.



Next we assemble the arms to the front pivot block. All the hingepins in this kit are captured, which is a very nice feature. The front pivot block has 2 holes in it to use setscrews to secure against 2 flats on the hingepins. Those hingepins won't be going anywhere.



Now we assemble the front skid, the upper bulkhead and the arms. The front pivot brace (the blue aluminum piece) on this kit can pop off from what I've read since it's held in place by the skid plate which can flex. I am going to run it stock for now, but if it becomes an issue I'll use an RB5 bumper under the skid to secure the pivot brace or possibly drill into it and secure it using some screws.

   
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JoFreak
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07.22.2010, 09:49 AM

Like the build so far, nicely detailed report from you, really nice...
Quote:
I ended up putting the contents of that bag on a table behind me so I could quickly grab what I needed from it.
I just throw every part on a big pile, before I start building a kit.
Has more of the old school Lego feeling
   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 09:52 AM

Now we move on to the servo saver. The instructions were a little difficult to understand on this step. At first I thought they were telling me to leave 1.5mm of the servo saver post above the screw on collar, but my collar bottomed out against the top of the post. After looking at it a few times, what they were telling me to do was leave 1.5mm of the bearing exposed above the collar. Notice how the bearing sits above the collar but is still held in place by the collar.



Now assemble the bellcranks and steering posts. I did make one change on this step. The kit comes with what appears to be 2 steel bushings that go into the steering rack to act as the pivot between rack and the bellcranks. I replaced these bushings with two 3x6x2.5mm flanged bearings. The bushings would work fine, but they bearings should last much longer.



Then I secured the steering assembly and the front bulkhead assembly to the chassis. I did run into a small snag here...



The manual calls for two 3x10mm button head screws to secure the left and right sides of the front bulkhead assembly to the chassis (its the top and bottom screws in this photo). These stripped pretty easily on me as I had used them to draw the bulkhead and chassis together. I think ultimately these screws are just slightly too short. I had some spare 3x12s that I used instead that tightened up nicely and held it all together.



Now we build up the front steering spindles. I was bummed to see plastic hexes as part of this assembly step, but that's easily remedied down the line. The bearings are teflon sealed, which I haven't seen since my old Losi days. I love this style of bearing and all the ones in the kit were nice and smooth.

   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 10:01 AM

Securing the spindles to the front arm, again the hinge pin is captured by a small screw on the back side of the arm (they used the same technique on the spindles as well).



Now it was time to build turnbuckles. This is potentially my least favorite part of building a kit; though it's competing with building shocks and gluing tires. These were actually super easy to build and of a very nice quality. Notice that there is a long end and a ...less long end for each turnbuckle. They looked the same to me until I looked a little harder. I decided to put the long end to the outside on all the turnbuckles and made sure to align the notch in the turnbuckles to one side so they all adjust the same direction. I actually just started them by hand, snapped them on carefully (so they didn't pull out of the ends) and then used pliers to draw them up. Took a lot of the pain out of this step, though a tool from Kyosho for this purpose would have been nice. I will say these are the first turnbuckles I've built where the pliers didn't gall them up. The finish on these is very resiliant.



Just another quick shot of the assembled turnbuckles from another angle.



Then we dig through Bag B for some bumper pieces and get those installed. I like these bumpers, though they do seem to have a bit more flex that other trucks I've seem, I wish RPM would release a bumper like they did for the Slash and SC10 for this truck. The ease of only having lower attachment points and the stiffness they built into the plate would be a nice addition to this truck.



Now to the ball diff... the bane of my existance.

   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 10:10 AM

25 minutes of cursing, swearing, yelling, panting, sweating and we finally have a diff! The screw to secure the diff is too short. If it had been 2-3mm longer it would have simplified this process significantly. Mine was ultimately built quite tight. I almost had it about right a couple of times and the screw would let go on me (even tight it doesn't seem to be securely engaging the nylon in the locknut). I plan to go gear diff on this shortly. It's a cheap and easy solution and it's easy to tune. Not as adjustable as a ball diff, but unless they update the screw for this, I'm curious how well I could set it up anyway. I'll also mention this is probably the 20th ball diff I've ever built, so it's something I've done before. This one just gave me fits.



Now after all that struggle it was nice to have an easy step. The bearings fit into the transmission housing nicely and everything slid together. I used some losi clear diff grease I had lying around to lube the gears a bit. I prefer their teflon grease for this, but can't seem to find it without buying 5 dollars in diff balls with it.



Now we install the motor plate and slipper. This is an easy process, but make sure you put a little locktite to secure the motor plate. I like the design of the slipper, though I wish they had used a more standardized spur gear. I don't like that I have to use a Kyosho spur. I would have preferred something I could get from Kimbrough as well to make it easier to get ahold of options. If I buy a gear or two though, I should be set.



Next is attaching the rear tower to the body mount. Everything assembles nicely and when you have a situation like you do here where the body mount sockets into the tower, it actually has a nice tight fit that holds in in place while you run the screws in. It's a small thing, but shows attention to detail that I like.



Now we attach the rear bulkhead to the chassis. Again with the plastic spacers.

   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 10:17 AM

Now we assemble the rear arms to the T-Plate. The arms are again captured by the mounts and the hinge pins have steel pivots that slide onto them and then go into the mount housings. This should provide maintenance free running for a while. My arms had a little bit of front to back play in them and a small shim would probably do away with it completely but a little play isn't a huge deal so I did without. One thing to note, the rear arm mount doesn't need to be tightened all the way just yet. The rear bumper ultimately slides underneath it so leave it a little loose to save some time later.



Now assemble the T-Plate to the chassis. It's starting to look like a truck at this point. Again everything slides together nice and tight and seems to socket into place. My T-Plate had a small piece of sprue on the front side that kept it from sitting flush with the chassis. I had to pull it back off and shave it down and then everything fit nicely.



Now install the transmission into the T-Plate.



Another view of the transmission installed. The T-Plate has a nice thick socket for it to fit into and it's a good tight fit.



Now we put the rear bumper in place and tighten the rear mount down completely. This bumper has a center support built in and flexes far less than the front bumper. It also acts as a motor guard and from a quick test fit, this nearly covers my entire Tekin 17.5 motor. Ultimately, I'll probably pick up Kyosho's motor centering kit and I'll have plenty of motor protection then.


Last edited by AMorgan; 07.22.2010 at 10:19 AM.
   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 10:30 AM

Now assemble the rear hubs... more plastic spacers. These are some very nice looking CVD units. They're small compared to the MIP units I'm used to, but I've heard really good things about them. I like that I can adjust roll with some spacers on these hubs. Plastic hexes show up here as well. I should have aluminum ones on this truck before I run it a second time, but these should be plenty to get me through Friday's race.



Now we assemble them to the arms. Captured pins yet again. These actually use the same style hinge pin as the Losi 8ight. Two nuts thread onto it, one on either side, to secure it. For having so many methods of capturing pins on one truck I feel confident that they will all hold quite well. Every hinge point on this truck has been perfect. No slop, but not bound up either.



Built the rear turnbuckles just like the front. Kyosho gives you dimensions for the turnbuckles that goes from the inner edge of the ball cup to the inner edge of the other ball cup. They're much easier to build than the center-to-center measurements that a lot of companies give you.



Finally attach the side nerf guards and battery mounts and the main chassis is done and ready to move on to the shocks. I really like these nerf guards compared to the other SCT trucks. Small but fairly stiff. They also snap onto the chassis before being screwed in. They're very well thought out.



That completes the main chassis. Time to start building some shocks. I've looked at the velvet shocks and my jaw dropped; they're beautiful. If they build half as nice as they look, they may very well take the pain out of building and bleeding shocks as well.
   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 10:32 AM

Jo, I see you snuck a comment in there. Thanks for the compliment. I like the idea of old school legos, but after building my HPI Cup Racer, I got tired of spending 20 minutes sifting through bits to find stuff, so I tried to keep this a little more organized :)
   
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JoFreak
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07.22.2010, 10:47 AM

Well, I thought there was a longer break coming, otherwise I wouldn't have interrupted you "picture flow" there, sorry
   
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AMorgan
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07.22.2010, 10:56 AM

No problem, man. I had originally planned one big post, but I screwed up and lost 20 minutes of work so I decided to break it up a bit.
   
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AMorgan
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07.24.2010, 04:47 PM

Let's wrap this up!

First you have to build the cartridge for the shock. I figured the bottom black piece would be plastic but was surprised to find gunmetal aluminum instead. I built the cartridges with some green slime and they went together quickly. I had already started loving these shocks (and wishing more brands would use them)



Next was building up the shafts and inserting them into the cartridges. I had planned to use 3B pistions all the way around... Kyosho only sends you two of each piston... I'll have to pick up a second piston tree if I want to use the 3Bs all the way around. Kind of disappointing, but I ended up putting the smaller holed 3 hole pistons in the rear. I figured the oil was lighter and a little extra pack wouldn't kill me.



Now install the caps onto the shock bodies. In hindsight, I probably should have oiled the o-rings before I tightened the caps on, but they didn't have any leaking issues that I can see so far. Honestly, I'm not even sure why there are caps on these shocks... they could have been solid and worked the same, but hey, the blue looks good.



Another shock body detail shot. It was hard to get a decent pics of the bodies...



Next it's time to fill the shock bodies with oil. Turns out a Rulux wheel makes a killer shock body stand. I let them sit for a bit to make sure there was no air in the bodies.



Then just button them up. I wish all shocks were this easy. You just hold the body upside down. Insert the cartridge and start tightening it until you feel resistance. Then back it off a half a turn and slowly compress the shock. Then use the specialty tool that Kyosho gives you to tighten up the cartridge and extend the shaft again. You now have shocks!

   
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AMorgan
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07.24.2010, 04:55 PM

Install spring collars and springs and finally a spring retainer and we're ready to start installing. Kyosho provides plastic balls for the top and bottom of the shocks, which bummed me out at first, I would have liked to have seen steel or aluminum. However, it turns out this is pretty smart. As you tighten up the nuts and screws to secure the shocks, there was a little play between the ball and the shock, so I tightened a little bit more and the plastic swelled and held the shocks slop free. I guess I'll see how this holds up.



Here's a shot of everything installed up front.



And the rear...



Then I installed the servo, I used a 9100S in mine. I love the speed on it. It worked really well.



Reciever and speed control go in, I used an RS Pro and a Futaba FASST reciever matched to my 3PK.



And bolt in the motor and you're off and running.



I am running this in a ROAR stock class, so I used a 17.5 motor. One issue I ran into is Kyosho's spur is intended more for a mod motor than a 17.5 so getting the gearing right was impossible. I ended up swapping some AE slipper pads and spur gear for a T4 on it to get the gearing close for racing. It worked without issue during my race, but I have a proper Kyosho gear coming. I topped the truck off with a JConcepts Manta body and ran stock SC10 tires up front and JConcepts subcultures in the rear. It's an odd combo but worked well on our lower traction track (though it really shined when we laid down some water and got the traction up a little bit).

I haven't been to a race in about 6 months, so I knew it would be a tough night, but I was anxious to see how the truck would do. I managed 4 out of 6 drivers and had to sit out a qualifier because of a dead radio, I need to find a larger pack for my Futaba controller. For having no idea on setup and just running the truck as I built it I was quite satisfied. With some tuning and a few parts, I think it will be seriously competitive. Probably more than my driving skills can do justice.
   
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JoFreak
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07.24.2010, 07:45 PM

Looks good. Any pictures of it with the body? Or haven't you painted it yet?
Have to say I'm a bit astonished to hear about plastic balls used with the shocks.
Will be interesting to see how long they work before something goes wrong with them.
   
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whitrzac
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07.24.2010, 09:14 PM

I don't know about the bottom ones(switched to TRX ones) but I'm runing shocks that are about a year old with no problems. I'v never seen these shocks leak, its sooo nice to go 2+ months without having to think about shocks

IMO you should stick with the AE spurs, they are cheaper, easier to find and offer a wider rang of gearing then the stock ones...

so your runing 3As in the front and 3Bs in back???

IDK if they will fit(hex depth), but kyosho makes an all alloy hex+axle for the front of the RB5 that is the same price as just the alloy hexes.



check the front bulkhead screws under the front bumper before your main, they WILL back off and alow it to move.

for the steering rack screws, thread them from the top and use a nut+shim, I'v striped more than one out.

IDK why the kit came with the POS ballcups but the ones that come with the RT5 pop off less often and last longer then the stockers...


pics of mine when I get home...
   
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AMorgan
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07.25.2010, 11:33 AM

I'll try and take some photos of it all together tonight. I honestly just got into a rush. First hop ups should be here Monday. Looking forward to cleaning and upgrading this truck.
   
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